Tag Archives: Remembrance Day

Dr. Kieran Moore, Provincial MOH, provides advice on celebrating Thanksgiving, Hallowe’en and Remembrance Day.

Dr. Kieran Moore says celebrating Thanksgiving indoors and unmasked with a fully vaccinated group is “absolutely appropriate”. However, it is important to continue following good public health practices.

If you choose to host an in-person gathering:

  • do not exceed the gathering limit of 25 people indoors and 100 people outdoors
  • have the fewest number of people possible at your gathering
  • use outdoor spaces whenever possible
  • provide all the necessary supplies, including hand sanitizer, soap and water
  • open windows, if possible
  • clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces
  • ask guests not to attend if they have symptoms, even if they are mild
  • make a list of guests attending in case your local public health unit needs it for contact tracing
  • remind people of public health advice to follow during the event
  • wash your hands before and frequently when preparing and serving food
  • have everyone wash their hands before and after eating

If you choose to attend an in-person gathering:

  • you should not attend if you have any symptoms, even if they are mild
  • wash your hands or use hand sanitizer regularly throughout the event
  • consider participating virtually or not attending the event if you are immunocompromised or at higher risk of severe disease or exposure to COVID-19covid 19

When to wear face coverings

Regardless of where you are, you can wear a face covering and physically distance if you feel it is right for you, especially if you or others are immunocompromised or at high-risk of severe disease or exposure to COVID-19covid 19. 

Indoors

When gathering indoors:

  • with a group of fully vaccinated individuals, you may consider removing your face covering if everyone is comfortable
  • with people from multiple households who are unvaccinated, partially vaccinated or status is unknown, you should wear a face covering and physically distance

Outdoors

When gathering outdoors:

  • with a group of fully vaccinated individuals, no face covering or physical distancing is necessary
  • with people from multiple households who are unvaccinated, partially vaccinated or vaccination status is unknown, you should consider wearing a face covering if physical distancing cannot be maintained

Celebrating Hallowe’en

If you trick-or-treat door-to-door:

  • stay home if you have symptoms, even if they are mild
  • trick-or-treat outdoors as much as possible
  • be creative and build the face covering into your costume. Remember that a costume mask is not a substitute for a face covering. A costume mask should not be worn over a non-medical mask or face covering because it can be dangerous if the costume mask makes it hard to breathe.
  • do not crowd doorsteps – take turns one at a time
  • do not sing or shout for your treats
  • keep interactions brief with those giving out treats
  • use hand sanitizer often, especially before and after handling your face covering, after touching frequently touched surfaces, when you arrive home from trick-or-treating, and before and after handling or eating treats
  • there is no need to clean or disinfect pre-packaged treats

If trick-or-treating indoors, maintain physical distancing as much as possible and wear a face covering, especially when physical distancing is a challenge.

If you choose to give out treats:

  • do not participate in Halloween festivities if you have symptoms, even if they are mild
  • keep interactions with trick-or-treaters short and encourage them to move along after receiving their treat from you
  • consider wearing a face covering when physical distancing cannot be maintained
  • consider including the face covering as part of your costume if you are dressing up
  • give out only purchased and packaged treats
  • do not ask trick-or-treaters to sing or shout for their treats
  • clean your hands often throughout the evening using soap and water or with hand sanitizer

Recognizing Remembrance Day

If attending a Remembrance Day memorial event:

  • stay home if you have symptoms, even if they are mild
  • wear a face covering indoors and wear one outdoors if physical distancing cannot be maintained or is required
  • wash your hands or use alcohol-based hand sanitizer frequently
  • consider participating virtually or not attending the event if you are immunocompromised or at higher risk of severe disease and/or exposure to COVID-19covid 19

If you chose to sell poppies in-person:

  • wear a face covering
  • have hand sanitizer and use it regularly
  • consider not selling if you are immunocompromised or at higher risk of severe disease and/or exposure to COVID-19

REMEMBRANCE DAY 2020

There will be no ceremony at our Cenotaph in Lockwood Park this morning due to COVID-19. Although unfortunate, this is the right decision by the Legion as the majority of people who attend the service are over 65 years of age.

Legions have suggested that at 11:00, you stand in remembrance at the end of your driveway. The church bell from St Paul’s will be ringing for the two minutes. (I can‘t confirm whether St Ed’s bell will be participating.)

Yes, this is another change in our lives due to COVID-19. However, the most important part of Remembrance Day is to remember those who have paid the ultimate price in defence of Canada. It is also the opportunity to stand behind the men and women who continue to serve in our military.

Terry Kelly wrote these lovely lyrics for a song that the Westport Ecumenical choir has sung the past few years at Lockwood Park during the Remembrance Day ceremony.


They fought and some died for their homeland
They fought and some died, now it’s our land
Look at his little child; there’s no fear in her eyes
Could he not show respect for other dads who have died?


Take two minutes, would you mind?
It’s a pittance of time
For the boys and the girls who went over
In peace may they rest, may we never forget
Why they died
It’s a pittance of time


God forgive me for wanting to strike him
Give me strength so as not to be like him
My heart pounds in my breast, fingers pressed to my lips
My throat wants to bawl out, my tongue barely resists


But two minutes I will bide
It’s a pittance of time
For the boys and the girls who went over
In peace may they rest
May we never forget
Why they died
It’s a pittance of time

Please take 2 minutes in time at 11:00 today. It’s a pittance in time.

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

A century ago, Canadian soldiers crossed a muddy ridge in Vimy, France, as they fought and died under the Red Ensign.

One hundred years ago, all four divisions of the Canadian Corps fought side-by-side for the first time as one formation at Vimy Ridge in France.  After four days of intense battle, there were nearly 3,600 of our soldiers lives lost, over 7,000 more wounded and countless displays of extraordinary courage.  The capture of Vimy Ridge was truly an incredible military victory.  We are proud and will never forget those who served in this great battle.

The Red Ensign was the flag they fought and some died under.  With many thanks to Greg Bisonette (Rusty), the Red Ensign is flying proudly at the Westport Cenotaph this week-end as we recognize the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

The Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 542 will assemble for the Remembrance Day ceremony on Sunday at 10:30.  The Westport Ecumenical Choir will also be providing the music, led by Joanne Lambert.

Weather still looks sunny and cold.  Please dress warmly.

Vimy Flag.jpg